6. What is adult literacy?

Before we continue, let's study a definition of adult literacy.


As you can see, the definition of adult literacy is fluid and changes over time. These days, the definition of literacy and numeracy includes the skills learned in technology-rich classroom environments.
  • Literacy can mean many things to many people. A literate, well-educated person from 1946 would find it difficult to decipher some of today's contracts, medical information, or office manuals, especially those pertaining to technology.
  • Attitude also plays an important role in adult literacy. An adult who manages to make a decent wage will often not view himself as illiterate until he faces a crisis, such as an impending job layoff, or has made a life-threatening error, such as giving his child an incorrect dosage of medication. 
  • Some individuals feel such a deep sense of shame about their inability to read or write that they go to great lengths to hide their illiteracy from friends and family. In this instance, confidentiality is extremely important.

Adult Motivation

Regardless of their level of education, adults lead busy lives. No matter how highly motivated their are to learn, adult learners will put family- or job-related obligations ahead of their tutoring sessions and reading assignments.The idea is to keep your student long enough to help them reach their literacy goals.

Adults vote with their feet and drop out if their needs are not being met. It is essential to establish a meaningful connection with your student so that he is motivated to return, even when hitting a rough patch. A tutor can accomplish this by:
1. Creating an atmosphere of respect.
2. Making learning interesting, enjoyable, or relevant.
3. Creating challenging learning experiences.
4. Setting your student up for success through explicit instruction, clear direction, and knowing his comfort level.
A similar pattern exists for tutors, who, like their adult students, need support and encouragement from literacy program staff after training. They also need to feel a sense of accomplishment in helping students reach their literacy goals, and a sense of community, where they can learn and exchange ideas with other tutors. 

Optional: Read the following article, Powerful Motivation: This long-Time Tutor Is Motivated by Helping Learners by Will Summers at: www.ncsall.net/?id=731.

What made this seasoned tutor eager to keep going? Keeping this article in mind, please complete the following assignment.
Optional: Adults in modern society are on a lifelong educational journey. This site by Raymond J. Wlodkowski offers many tips on how to motivate adults, help them develop positive attitudes, and cultivate their interest and curiosity.

Dan Pink: The Puzzle of Motivation

Optional: Watch the TED video (18 min), The Puzzle of Motivation by Dan Pink (click on link), in which he examines the puzzle of motivation, starting with a fact that social scientists know but most managers don't: Traditional rewards aren't always as effective as we think. He provides illuminating stories — and maybe, a way for us to motivate our adult students through autonomy, mastery, and purpose.


Required Assignment
Post your observations to one of the following statements as a "comment." Then read what others have to say.
  • How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?

  • What factors do you think would cause you to drop out of tutoring?

  • How would these factors compare to an adult student's reason for staying in a program or quitting it?

    248 comments:

    1 – 200 of 248   Newer›   Newest»
    Program Coordinator said...

    Factors that would cause you to drop out of tutoring:
    1. lack of communication, support or recognition from Literacy organization
    2 failure of student to attend sessions
    3 other obligations and responsibilities
    4 health issues

    Kim Shelor said...

    The most common reason for some of our folks dropping out is the realization of how hard "this" can be...especially with a non-reader. Some other factors are... A a tutor, the things that would make me drop put would be lack of interest from the student, and personal crisis. I feel very strongly that tutors and student may quit for much the same reasons. Lack of child care, lack of interest, and fear. Our tutors often fear they are not going to be able to tutor a student the way he/she deserves. Not because of bad training, but because of their own insecurities...it is very similar with learners, they are just harder on themselves.

    zane said...

    As the adult learners enrich their own lives, they become building blocks of education in their families,neighborhoods,and jobs. The world is much smaller now, and we impact others so easily.

    Rhonda Brewer said...

    Obviously, changes in my life or that of my family could prevent me from continuing as a tutor. Other than that, the only thing that would cause me to drop out is if I didn't feel that I was accomplishing anything. As long as I have a tutee that is interested and progressing, I would want to keep that progress going

    Pearle said...

    I think that tutor and student share some of the same motivating factors for participating in an adult literacy program. If either person feels that the experience does not enrich their life or that it is a waste of time, quitting the program appears a likely decision.

    Celeste Morris said...

    What factors do you think would cause you to drop out of tutoring?

    Well, my answer is very close to what is already posted here.

    1) Change in obligations, not having the time to prepare study materials nor being able to meet regularly with the student

    2) Health issues that would impact the time spent with the student or that would prevent me from meeting with the student on a regular basis

    3) Feeling or somehow knowing that my efforts were not making a difference in my student’s life

    Catherine said...

    Some factors that may cause me to drop out of tutoring include
    1. Stress from family to spend time at home
    2. Learner is uninterested or unmotivated
    3. Lack of confidence that I'm actually helping the learner.

    Just took a peek at the other responses and see that the factors are similar for most folks - learners and tutors.

    meligrif said...

    Factors that would cause you to drop out of tutoring:

    1. Increasing demands from job and family
    2.The student not being motivated or their lack of attendance
    3.Not seeing results, the tutor believing that they are not making a difference

    Queen Of My Castle said...

    I feel that I have had a chance to cheat on this section. During my 5weeks or so in this position, I have called many previous tutors and students to find out their current interest in the program.

    The most common reasons on both aspects have been:

    1) Work Schedules
    2) Family Obligations (babysitting the grandkids)
    3) Health

    and unfortunately on the part of tutors is death. It seems that many of the tutors in our community that truly made a difference, were at a later stage of life. I think that they obtained a level of patience that most of us could never comprehend!

    FortMiles said...

    Factors that might cause me to terminate my involvement:
    1. Learner working no where near as hard as I am or irresponsible about showing up at all;
    2. My inability to tutor successfully; or
    3. Unexpected changes in my other commitments.

    tutorgirl said...

    I agree that tutors and learners would share common issues related to motivation. Both would be inspired by progress or discouraged by lack of progress. I would imagine that family issues,transportation and childcare could also be reasons for tutor or learner dropout.

    Shannon said...

    Factors that would cause a tutor to drop out (these are my own worries):
    1. Lack of time, or tutoring interfering with full-time job
    2. Feeling that the learner is not making any progess

    Joanna said...

    I think the main factor that would cause someone to drop out of tutoring would be a lack of a feeling of accomplishment. If someone feels discouraged that they are not progressing as fast as they want or even at all, he or she might be tempted to quit.

    Biltz said...

    I think that my desire to continue tutoring will be very much related to progress of my "learner" (I did like this description from the article). If the learner is making progress, I think we will both be motivated to move forward. I am beginning to see that this will be very much a team effort and that we will only be successful together. We will have to find ways around the hurdles we face together, whatever they are.

    puddlefrog said...

    Actually seeing progress is an amazingly powerful incentive to keep on. But just having a good connection, good communication, an honest relationship with my learner, even if progress is slow, can keep me going. If I thought my learner did not value our sessions, and did not try to be there as promised, I would probably not be motivated to continue. Conversely, I think my learner would lose interest if I seemed uninterested or bored, or unprepared.

    beth said...

    factors that would cause me to drop out...student not attending sessions regularly or not committed enough to do assignments at all, personal crisis..can't think of any other reasons.

    Kellydog said...

    Sometimes the organization that puts the students and tutors together does not provide the support needed to keep the learning process going. Having rooms available, materials to help the lessons or onoing refresher classes are vital to the success.

    tkurylo1 said...

    Two factors that I can see causing be to drop tutoring are family obligations or the student not participating in the lessons.

    BOC said...

    The things that would make me drop out of tutoring would be twofold:
    1. If my commitments at home (family, health issues, job) became too much and interfered with my ability to tutor.
    2. Lack of interest by the student. When I have tutored in the past, I have never had this problem. Sometimes the student might have pressing obligations and skip sessions, making it appear they are uninterested. But if in talking with them, some changes to the schedule or location would make it easier, then I would still want to try.

    David H. said...

    My motivation to teach is, I hope, as strong as someone's desire to learn. I think the student shows that there is strong desire to begin with in just taking that first step.

    The biggest factor when it comes to sticking with tutoring is progress. I love to see progress in anything I do, and it's discouraging when I don't see it being made. This is a double-edged sword, not to take it personally when progress isn't going as fast as I think it should. And also to be sensitive and not allow my preconceived notions overrule what progress actually is being made.

    For an adult-learner, progress must be very important as well. Hopefully through motivation and through demonstrating that we are undertaking something very much worth the effort, we can negate some those obstacles.

    Jesse said...

    Motivation comes from results, just as the tutor in the article had stated. If there is progress, that alone can be an exciting thing. I am interested in doing this because I like helping people, whether it be one-on-one or in groups. Being part of the literacy solution is motivation enough for me.

    Jesse said...

    Motivation comes from results, just as the tutor in the article had stated. If there is progress, that alone can be an exciting thing. I am interested in doing this because I like helping people, whether it be one-on-one or in groups. Being part of the literacy solution is motivation enough for me.

    Jesse said...

    Motivation comes from results, just as the tutor in the article had stated. If there is progress, that alone can be an exciting thing. I am interested in doing this because I like helping people, whether it be one-on-one or in groups. Being part of the literacy solution is motivation enough for me.

    Jesse said...

    Motivation comes from results, just as the tutor in the article had stated. If there is progress, that alone can be an exciting thing. I am interested in doing this because I like helping people, whether it be one-on-one or in groups. Being part of the literacy solution is motivation enough for me.

    mayflower said...

    I imagine that I would start the tutoring process much like a learner, with excitement and some anxiety about this new venture. With time, I may feel frustration or self-doubt with slow progress; I will probably feel the pressures of work and family obligations. I will have to find ways to keep the process rewarding and intersting.

    lillian said...

    The best rewards of teaching/tutoring are intangible.

    Pat said...

    Different factors that would cause student to drop out.
    1. Lack of commitment
    2. to hard
    3. no support from family
    4. lack of transportation

    Gerri said...

    I am sure the student's/learner's desire to continue to be taught is affected by many things. Their relationship with their tutor would be a big one. Also their self-esteem and more practically, their ability to complete day to day activities more easily. As for my desire to begin/continue with tutoring students, I am guessing a good relationship with the student would be important and their ability to progress would certainly be a huge incentive to keep at it.

    Jenny said...

    My motivation for doing this comes from Micah 6:8 God requires of us, his followers to act justly and love mercy. Helping the homeless and poor population learn to read fits right in with that. That will not be the same motivation as the learners. The one learner we have so far is motivated to get his driver's licence.

    The only factors that would cause me to drop out would be illness or some other crisis.

    I think that the learner's ability to stick to this will be based on his/her sense of success. If he/she feels successful or senses progress I believe they will continue to come as long as they can.

    jack said...

    Reasons for dropping out of tutoring:

    1.The lack of communication, honest relationship with the learner or any other factors that would hinder progress.

    2.Change in family obligations and other responsibilities.

    Laura said...

    I think two factors that would be the most likely to cause me to drop out are: 1) If I wasn't able to establish a good working-relationship with the student or if the student acted disinterest/not committed 2) Unexpected life changes such as the need to relocate for a job.

    gsturdy said...

    An uninterested or unmotivated learner would make being a tutor quite difficult. At the same time, however, a large part of the tutor's "job" is to provide learning experiences that help motivate and encourage the student.

    Ms. Ovette said...

    Q: How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?

    A: I'm assuming some level of motivation from the learner based on his or her showing up for the session. I imagine it can take a great deal of soul searching and self-motivation just to show up the first time. So that's where this all has to start. The second half of the equation is my own motivation as a literacy instructor. I see literacy training as a way to make incredible positive changes in the lives of others, one person at a time. And frankly, that's about as much of the responsibility to leave the world a better place than I found it as I can handle. Those two desires have to be there --the desire of the learner to learn and the desire of the teacher to assist in the learning. It will definitely involve some uphill travel and just as the learner can not manage the climb unassisted by someone to pull him forward (or at least to keep him from rolling downhill when he stops to catch his breath), the instructor can not be expected to drag dead weight uphill. The learner must make the attempt to climb.

    kjlinc said...

    I think that tutors often have similar reasons for dropping out as learners. For instance, changes in circumstance or perceptions of inefficacy can cause either the tutor or the learner to stop the lessons.

    broncos319 said...

    As some of my peers on this page have noted, many people drop out of tutoring because they believe it is "too hard" or because their personnal lives interfere. If a student wants to be tutored and wants to learn, then they must be as dedicated as the person tutoring them.

    Fernando said...

    The motivation that both tutor and learner have to attend a session is to acomplish their goals, if both feel they are getting something out of each lesson they will both want to come back, but if sessions go by and there is no concrete goal achievement then boht can get discouraged.

    demelza99 said...

    One reason often given for causing a tutor to drop out is feeling you are not making a difference. I would think that learners face a similar problem in feeling that they are not making progress.

    Paula said...

    Life changes are a common denominator in dropping out between the student and tutor.

    1. Family responsiblities
    2. Health issues
    3. Work responsiblities
    4. FEAR

    Lisa said...

    One reason for a learner to drop out of the program is a satisfaction with mediocrity. The same feelings that led a person to drop out of high school probably won't change into adulthood without some extraordinary counter influence to change his mind. When the initial enthusiasm wears off and the realization of the long term hard sets in, satisfaction with mediocrity can be overwhelming.

    Rob said...

    I'll likely have to drop out when I graduate school and leave Williamsburg at the end of the semester, but tutoring is something I can pick up somewhere else if I find that it suits me. If I stop tutoring, it will be because I'm insufficiently fulfilled by it. This would also seem to be true for a learner, who doesn't get out of it what he or she had hoped.

    Cherry said...

    I'm still hoping that tutoring will be a good fit for me, so I have some anxiety about my own performance. If, in spite of all the backup available, and after a fair trial, I felt I was not doing the job well, I'd quit, and the learner could be passed on to a more talented tutor.

    Denise said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?
    I think it would allow me to stay excited and motivated knowing my learner felt the same way. It would push me that much more knowing I have a learner who really believes I have the ability to teach him/her, and he/she is eager to graps what I have to offer.

    In Word Adorning said...

    There is a parallel between the learners motivation and the tutors desire. Both want to be there because they recognize a need. A tutor will be as enthusiastic and as motivated as their learner becaue tutors are inspired by their students achievements and success creates more enthusiasm and zeal in learners. Especially those that have not had success in the past, or have not had time to devote to themselves and their needs.

    dianer said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?

    Our individual reasoning for attending sessions indicate a positive trait common in our communities: self-improvement & pursuit of happiness.

    Dixie Lee said...

    The main factors that will enfluence my ability to continue with tutoring will be the support from or communication with the Literacy organization and the continuing interest of the Learner. As long as these factors are in place, we will be able to go forward and hopefully accomplish tangible goals.

    marcy said...

    I would only drop out of tutoring if I were ill or my husband was ill. I would consider it an exciting 2nd career.

    Sally M said...

    I think the biggest factor to drop out of tutoring fo rme would be time. I work out of town and it may not be easy to meet with my student. I can also see a problem with my student not showing up for a planned time.

    Gregory said...

    Neither tutors nor learners receive immediate compensation, monetary or otherwise, for their efforts, and this can be discouraging.

    JWKing said...

    •How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?
    Actually, they would not parallel but be opposite. If my learner showed a lack of motivation, it would just encourage me to want to work harder to get her on board. I would think that she is feeling self conscious, upset about a lack of ability, wanting to see improvement faster, or possibly having problems at home or work. I would just be full of compliments, encouragement, and support and bring her around to opening up to me or at least feeling ready to put her concerns aside and learn.

    JWKing said...

    I just read my comment and it sounds naive...like I can just say a few words and turn an unmotivated student into a motivated one. Looks like I am setting myself up for the fall. But in working with students with intellectual disabilities, I find that they often come in feeling down because their feelings have been hurt or someone has been rude to them. They really need to know someone cares and a compliment or kind word can quickly bring them out of the slump and help get them on task and busy. They oftentimes don't have a caring, interested person in their lives and they respond quickly to someone who genuinely cares.

    Kevin Giedd said...

    The idea about highlighting words in a newspaper sounds interesting. The same could be done for food labels to encourage everyday reading.

    Kristin said...

    I think both myself and the learner will have outside forces pulling us to do things other than tutoring but the rewards that we gain from these sessions should outweigh the things that our families and friends want us to do. If the rewards did not outweigh what the learner or myself were doing, I guess it would be difficult to continue on. I don't see a personal crisis happening in my life or any health issues but that's not say that they aren't possible as well and the same could happen to the learner. I would hope that if something does happen where would walk away from the program, we could still come back one day because I think this is something that will help round out my life and I know that the learner would benefit from these sessions.

    Pablo said...

    We both want to do something good and to better ourselves - me through service, them through their definition of personal growth. But feelings of frustration whether its caused from not making progress or anything else can contribute to either of us wanting to quit. Progress tends to inspire and motivate - success can also scare. Faith, focus, and trust is key.

    Pablo said...

    We both want to do something good and to better ourselves - me through service, them through their definition of personal growth. But feelings of frustration whether its caused from not making progress or anything else can contribute to either of us wanting to quit. Progress tends to inspire and motivate - success can also scare. Faith, focus, and trust is key.

    Mardet said...

    Factors that would cause me to drop out of tutoring:

    1. Lack of support within the community
    2. Inadequate training to prepare for beginning a program
    3. Health Issues
    4. Students unwillingness to attend or see the benefit of a program

    Lia Keston said...

    Like many people, I'm motivated by feeling that I'm accomplishing or contributing something. If I felt I wasn't an effective tutor, or wasn't able to dedicate the required time and effort, that might cause me to stop participation. Similarly, I expect that learners who feel they are not succeeding might be discouraged.

    Lee said...

    I feel a lack of interest from an adult learner can dampen my enthusiasum. However, I feel it is important to be positive but go into this knowing that there may be some apprehension on the part of the learner and until a relationship is established and trust is built we may have a few hurdles to jump. Going into this with too much wind in the sails wanting to just have a lesson that yeilds a reader in a short time is a sure way to lose steam and yourself dropping out on your committment. I hope I keep this in mind and do not lose motivation. Slow and steady wins the race.

    Lee said...

    I would say the health of my child or myself could be a factor although i am particularly healthy now. I hope this stays the same for quite some time. I had problems with transportation at one point and I seem to have fixed that problem but it could easily be an issue for me as I live in a rural area. I am pretty adept at managing time and my schedule so hopefully this will not be a factor.

    I could see how not having my ducks in a row could easily affect the progress and motivation of an adult learner struggling to maintain interest, motivation and their life difficulties. I think it is very important to communicate, be flexible and try not to be the one to cancel appoints if it is at all possible.

    asls said...

    What factors do you think would cause you to drop out of tutoring?

    If I were ineffective or were not making any progress, I would lose motivation to continue.

    beth said...

    Since tutoring is a voluntary endeavor on both sides, outside obligations could pull both tutors and learners away from putting time into the program. Personally, the most likely factors I could imagine causing me to quit would be conflicts with work or school. Similarly, I would think that work and family would be the first priorities for learners.

    sandy said...

    Factors that could cause me to d/c tutoring are:
    * discouraged if I continued to show up and my student did not.
    *Also, I am in the "sandwich generation," and with two 80+ year old parents, we never know when either our parents or our children are going to need us.

    missy said...

    I would like to help a student better themselves. The importance of reading is the key to a better life.
    The student realizes he will improve his and his familys life

    Anne said...

    What factors do you think would cause you to drop out of tutoring?
    1. If my learners didn't show up on a regular basis.
    2. Feeling like I was a very ineffective tutor.
    3. Too many other responsibilities, the realization that I didn't have time to do this.
    4. Graduation, since I probably won't live in the area afterward.

    A said...

    Both the learner and I are there in a state of humility and on the road to understanding. What factors would cause me to drop out of tutoring? Well I certainly hope I can handle my college courses while putting in the time. I think I can, I think I will only have to stop tutoring or change venues when I move to a new place. As long as the learner is willing to put in the time, it's on me to give as much and more back.
    -Kat Zantow

    Charlie said...

    What factors do you think would cause you to drop out of tutoring?

    Failure of student to attend sessions

    Failure of myself to advance the student's understanding

    Inadequate support from literacy organization

    Charlie said...

    What factors do you think would cause you to drop out of tutoring?

    Failure of student to attend sessions

    Failure of myself to advance the student's understanding

    Inadequate support from literacy organization

    halewr said...

    I might drop out if If the learner looses confidence in me or we cannot establish mutual respect.

    Rebekah said...

    The motivation and attendance of an adult learner would affect my motivation and confidence just as much as if the coin were flipped. If my adult learner doesn't show up multiple times, is late, or doesn't show interest, my motivation level will drop simply because it doesn't seem like a mutual effort.

    Megan said...

    I think the only reason I would drop out would be because of other commitments. I think that the learner would also drop out for other time commitments, including work and family.

    Marian said...

    I am approaching the program as a learning experience for myself as well as the learner. I am looking forward to the challenge of making learning ineresting and enjoyable for the learner - an outlet for my dormant creativity in that arena - not loosing site of the hard work it will require from both of us. It would take a lot for me to want to quit, despite my learner's attitude, which I would hope to be able to tweak if necessary. If someone got violent with me, as mentioned in the article, I would probably want to discontinue tutoring with that particular learner, but not quit the program. The ultimate motivation for me, and for the learner, would be making progress; a feeling of accomplishment. In addition, for me, knowing I am helping someone to become more at ease with life.

    Mutahara said...

    The most common thing for some people to drop out of a literacy class is getting frustrated and thinking that they are somehow stupid and can never get through the class. Economic issues and support at home would be some others.

    corn said...

    The learner is pron to drop out if the benefits of continuing are not obvious. Keep the benefits primary and on-going for the student.

    katherine said...

    I would be tempted to drop out if I was having trouble communicating and building respect and trust with the learner. I think that goes both ways; if the learner doesn't trust or understand me, they wouldn't be motivated to come.

    Julia said...

    An adult student's reasons for staying or quitting are similar to an adult tutor's reasons: frustration, health issues, personal problems, unforeseen crises requiring attention. As much as possible, the student and the tutor should communicate and keep each other informed about potential problems or issues that might sidetrack the program.

    aileen a said...

    The tutor-learner relationship seems very mutually beneficial, with each relying on the other's enthusiasm and commitment; my motivation to tutor is paralleled by the goals we will make jointly and the connection that we will build.

    I think I would keep this in mind (long term goals, importance of connection, creating enthusiasm) to avoid dropping out! Reasons for ending my tutoring commitment would probably be a learner continually missing sessions with no explanation, or sudden changes in my work schedule.

    IJM said...

    Factors that would cause me to drop tutoring:

    If I felt I wasn't a positive presence in the learner's experience; if I wasn't able to devote meaningful time to the program because of personal- or school-related commitments (though this program ranks high on my list of priorities); if the learner wasn't invested in lessons or able to make it; health issues.

    Linda said...

    The number one factor that would cause me to drop out of tutoring would be a lack of support from the Literacy group.

    Kareemah said...

    Factors that would cause me to drop out of tutoring might be:

    Not being able to connect personally to a series of learners. I don't think 'failure' with one student would make me quit, but if it was a series of learners, it would make me consider.
    I might discover that I am overwhelmed by the responsibility that is carried with this volunteer tutor position, but hopefully there will be people to turn to that can keep me on track.

    As has been stated: health issues or duties and responsibilities that I cannot balance with the volunteerism due to a lack of understanding of what it takes outside the meeting to prepare.

    Anita said...

    Having chosen the post-retirement phase of my life to become involved in a literacy program, I would have concerns about my health or the health of my spouse. However, I'm excited about the opportunity to make a difference and hope health issues do not interfere.

    Diane said...

    The main factor that would cause me to drop out of tutoring would be not being able to connect with my learner. I want to be able to make a difference in my learner's life.

    FrankF said...

    Lack of time to read up on topics that I feel would enrich my training efforts might lead me to resign from being a tutor, however, I would work hard to overcome that by burning the midnight oil.

    Also, if the student looked as if he was no longer interested that might tend to discourage me in teaching. I would ask for help if that occurred.

    Angelique said...

    My learner has a primary goal of achieving her GED so that she can attend college. Her secondary goal is to achieve employment in the Health care field. These are her motivating factors: personal achievement, giving back and financial stability. My motivating factors are : giving back, her success is my success as well, and teaching her refreshes me as well.

    Jo L said...

    Based on my assessment of how this works, Dropping out, which isn't my style, would probably be due to a major illness or health issue that would be out of my control. With other challenges, such as boredom, not seeing progress on their part, failure to show up or get the work done would be obstacles that can be addressed in conversation if we have a trusting relationship.

    doree said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?

    I would hope that we would both be able to acknowledge that we hope to gain something from our time together. Since I have not yet had an adult learner to tutor I do not know how my desire would parallel their own. I do know that when engaging in any relationship I enjoy learning about other people's cultures- whether they are from down the street or from across the sea.

    What factors do you think would cause you to drop out of tutoring?

    The major factor would be my schooling, since I am currently pursuing a Master's while working full time. Other factors would include relationship obligations with family members.

    How would these factors compare to an adult student's reason for staying in a program or quitting it?

    I think most individuals can relate to learning how to prioritize their educational goals alongside familial obligations and job responsibilities.

    Ms. Educator said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?

    Their motivation parallel's my desire to tutor greatly, because if they are not progressing due to lack of motivation, frustrations, and intimidation, that means that I'm not getting across in a way that's productive and helpful to them. My success in helping people in this program depends solely on their success in receiving the information. If they are motivated to come back and continue to work with me, then progress has been made.

    gailfrederick77 said...

    Factors that would cause me to drop out of tutoring would pro bably be the same as for the learner although my being retired will allow me more flexibility. Life can get in the way of furthering ones education and hiding illiteracy can become tiring and inconvenient. Tutoring can be an enriching experience for all concerned I think.

    Elizabeth said...

    Factors that would cause me to drop out of tutoring are: not being able to feel effective in helping the learner or to see reasonable progress, lack of interest from the learner, or concerns about my own safety.

    newtutortrainee said...

    Dropping out as a tutor might result from a recognized inability to communicate effectively and apply real-world knowledges to basic skills in literacy. Likewise, if the learner does not see any real-world value in his/her training, interest in continuing would likely wane.

    Planetahermoso said...

    There must be a correlation between my motivation and enthusiasm to tutor and my learner's motivation to attend the session. With that being said, adults have busy lives and there are a number of factors which may cause me as well as the learner to drop out of tutoring. I agree with the other comments, that learners and tutors may quit for the same reasons. Factors would be that tutors have other obligations and no longer have time, health issues, failure of student to attend the sessions.

    Planetahermoso said...
    This comment has been removed by the author.
    franbabineau said...

    An adult learner might drop out of the program if they are not achieving their personal goals. The tutor might quit the program if they feel that their efforts have not achieved their expectations.

    Shirley said...

    Motivation: I am so in agreement with Will as far as "the accomplishments of the learners" as one of the most satisfying reasons to continue (and enjoy) tutoring. In my experience as an Instructor, nothing delights my heart more than seeing the light shine in a learner's "eye", when she or he realizes that they get it!

    Shirley Smith

    Betty Ann Brophy said...

    Ithink the factor that would most make me drop out is if I couldn't make a connection with my learner so that we both would look forward to our sessions on both a personal and professional way.

    cheryl said...

    A change in my family obligations or health problems might cause me to drop out of the program, but I consider this an important commitment.

    Daylee said...

    A lack of time, it is so easy to be over committed that it would be too hard to fit everything in. That could be a reason to drop out of tutoring.

    FCP said...

    Hopefully, I will be able to motivate my learner to want to attend every session. If that level of desire is not evident to the learner, then they will think that the sessions are important.Leadership is not a spectator sport.

    karenzpt said...

    The motivation of a student would be very important to me as a tutor since I like positive feedback too. It would be very difficult to tutor someone who doesn't really know if they want to be there.
    I don't think I would stop tutoring unless I was in ill health. If a student did not attend sessions then I would try and get situated with another student.

    Black Spot said...

    As a student with a part-time job time is very precious to me, so I have to make sure that I am able to balance these essential considerations with the time it takes to be an effective tutor.

    Terry said...

    The tutor's desire to teach and the learner's motivation to comprehend new things are fundamentally the same. In fact, I feel that this union is entirely complimentary, because unless the learner is an autodidact and very disciplined, he will need someone to facilitate the learning process and provide motivation to reach self-established milestones.

    Olivia said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?

    I want to tutor because I want to develop a skill I feel I don't really have a handle on yet. For the learner, that skill is literacy. For me, I want to learn how to present information in clear and concise ways that will make sense to others. The common desire is improved communication.

    Dusty said...

    Factors that would cause me to separate from the tutoring role include:

    ** Change in personal health or family priorities

    ** Absence of commitment or work ethic by learners after reasonable allowances for life and family circumstances

    ** Insistence on burdensome bureaucracy by the literacy organization

    ---- JTM

    Dusty said...

    Reasons to depart from my role as a volunteer tutor include:

    ** Changes to personal health or family priorities

    ** Absence of commitment or work ethic by the learner/student given reasonable latitude for personal/family obligations and transportation challenges.

    ** Bureaucratic methods imposed by the literacy organization

    JeremyK said...

    Hopefully I would not do anything that would cause a student to want to give up on achieving his/her literacy aspirations. (If I did, I would hope someone would call me on it before it was too late for the student!) As far as what the student could do to make me want to throw in the towel: Making me feel like I "owed" them something, when I clearly don't. This is a volunteer position and, while I'm happy to do it, they must realize that they have to (1) put effort in and (2) respect me like I respect them.

    rsvmi52 said...

    As I study this course, I begin to have concerns of my own abilities in successfully tutoring adults. Mentoring Elem and Mid School seemed right down my alley but the more I get into this study program, I become less confident.

    rsvmi52 said...

    This study course is overwhelming and I am losing confidence in my ability to handle this program. If I have trepedations about this study course, will I have confidence to continue with a adult learner.

    Lynn said...

    What factors do you think would cause you to drop out of tutoring?

    If I am not able to come up with suitable lesson plans to help the student.
    If my parents become ill.
    Lack of interest from students.

    Dee Ann Evans said...

    Any factors may make me drop out of tutoring, including increase in Work requirements that impact my free time, increasing gas prices that make extra trips unaffordable, feeling that I am not doing a good job and the learner is making progress.

    neg said...

    Red tape and jumping through hoops would cause anyone to quit. If either person feels that the experience does not enrich their life or that it is a waste of time, quitting the program appears a likely decision. Health or transportation reasons.

    Laurie said...

    I'm concerned that I might try to do too much, spend too much time and develop unreal expectations for my learner. This waas my experience as a new teacher, so I'll be on the look out for these developments.

    TGLowe said...

    It's easier to observe behavior than to assess attitude towards learning. If the learner is always late, doesn't complete assignments, can't focus on the lesson, is not receptive to constructive feedback, etc., it will be challenging to stay motivated as a tutor.

    Sharon said...

    this website is nuts. this is the 3rd time I've left a comment, and it hasn't shown up. Discouragement would cause me to stop tutoring, and it would take a lot to make me quit. However, I'm feeling tons of discouragement right now over what I'm going through on this website.

    John Henry said...

    I think that I might drop out of tutoring if I felt that my learner was not making any progress at all after half a dozen sessions or so.

    deirdreluvswmbg said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?

    * Desire to learn
    * Desire to improve knowledge in reading, writing and math
    * Better communication skills

    Linda said...

    For both parties (tutor and learner) to continue being motivated, it has to be progressive and have a mutually beneficial sense of relationship one to the other. It's the duty of the tutor to keep the learner interested in learning and the duty of the learner to be diligent and desirous to learn.

    Meghan said...

    My motivations to tutor are likely similar to the learner's motivations in coming to sessions in that I anticipate the experience will enrich my life. However, I can imagine that other obligations (like having to take care of a family member, an increase in job responsibilities, etc.) or a failure to see a positive change after a certain number of sessions might lead me (or my learner) to consider stopping sessions.

    sefutrell said...

    I think that for adult learners it would, in general, be much more of a challenge for them to re-enter and immerse themselves in the reading process. Their immediate obligations to family, friends, and might discourage them from coming to tutoring. They may also become disillusioned by the difficulty of learning to read. A health issue could arise that would prevent them from being able to attend sessions. A myriad of factors could prevent them from coming to tutoring, but as their tutor it would be my responsibility to encourage them in any way I can.

    Ronna said...

    Keeping motivated is very important to both tutor and learner. A motivated learner is more likely to work harder but also enjoy the process. A motivated tutor continues to seek better ways in which to reach the student to make the learning process more meaningful. If either person is not feeling motivated, rather than quit tutoring, I would consider a different learner and I would hope that a learner might consider doing the same. If no productive connection can be made between the tutor and learner - it might be better to move on to someone else.

    Danielle said...

    I think as the tutor, I share some of the same determining factors for desiring to tutor. First of all, I am hoping tutoring to enrich my own life in order to meet my own goals as the same as for the learner. This is the major reason for dropping out on both counter parts; learner and tutor, when either loses the significance of the experience.

    SNelson said...

    Factors that would make me drop out would be Securing a full time job, major changes in my personal life not in my control.

    Patty said...

    I could see not remaining a tutor if after trying it I did not feel I was helping the learners. I have never attempted teaching before. Patty

    RR said...

    Factors that would possibly cause me to stop tutoring would be lack of time, and lack of interest by the learners. I would try tutoring another learner before dropping out.

    Carissa Priebe said...

    If I were the learner, I would be most deterred by a tutor who didn't seem interested in me or what my goals were... The interview link hit home with me because the tutor expressed how important it is to show an interest and study what the learner is interested in-- and he gave many good sample ways of doing that

    Lynne B said...

    I would consider the lack of progress on the part of the student and resulting feelings of inadequacy for the tutor would be a reason to quit. The desire to succeed must be equal on both parts.
    Lynne B

    Betsy said...

    I am very motivated to help an adult learner. I would hope my enthusiasm would be contagious. The learner will have to give up on me; I won't give up on her.

    Martha said...

    I can see a clear correlation to a learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions and their desire to tutor. My desire to tutor stems from my position of being someone who utilized tutoring. I greatly benefited from it and simply want to give back.

    Lynne B said...

    My desire to succeed as a tutor will need to match the desire of the student. If I try hard to learn to be a good tutor I hope the desire will be reciprocated in the desire of the student to better themselves and their level of over-all education.
    Lynne B.

    ? Mark said...

    I think I would need to see progress on the part of my learner and it could be a challenge for me to remain patient if circumstances beyond his/her control hinder that.

    ? Mark said...

    I think I would need to see progress on the part of my learner and it could be a challenge for me to remain patient if circumstances beyond his/her control hinder that.

    ? Mark said...

    I think I would need to see progress on the part of my learner and it could be a challenge for me to remain patient if circumstances beyond his/her control hinder that.

    retirednotdead said...

    Factors causing dropout:
    1. health issues
    2. emergency in family
    3. learner is a "no show"
    4. loss of volunteer time (full time employment)
    I see how these would also affect a learner's ability to continue in the learning track...

    Linda C. said...

    The most likely cause of my dropping out as a tutor would be family obligations, such as taking care of someone who is ill. It would also be hard to keep going if the student is lackadaisical or is continually pulled away from tutoring sessions. Linda C.

    Linda C. said...

    The most likely cause of my dropping out as a tutor would be family obligations, such as taking care of someone who is ill. It would also be hard to keep going if the student is lackadaisical or is continually pulled away from tutoring sessions. Linda C.

    Megan N said...

    Factors that would cause you to drop out of tutoring...
    1. Feeling as if I am not doing well as a tutor, that possibly I need more education on how to educate, since I am only 18.
    2. Other obligations, I will be attending college soon, so that would cause me to drop out of tutoring.
    3. My student not attending sessions, then it would make me feel like "What's the point?"

    Linda A said...

    Linda A. I have done a little tutoring at the college, and it is frustrating when the student doesn't show up, but it is also great when you can see that they understand something you have taught them. I am concerned that my school schedule will get in the way, but I am going to make it work.

    mary Garlock said...

    I would drop out if the tutoring interfered with school work or if I had a family or health issue. Maybe I should consider the school work as a possible conflict before I start tutoring.

    Kenneth Zen Bodhi said...

    The factors that could cause me to drop out of tutoring would be.

    1. Health realted issues. This would be an unavoidable issue and one that would be devastating to have to deal with.

    2. Student quitting. Though this would end the current student tutor relationship, this would not end my tutoring commitment to the program.

    lizbeth rakaczky said...

    I find the writer's creative teaching strategies very interesting and motivating. If a tutor can find out-of-the box, non-traditional learning strategies to keep a learner's desire to attend class and focus, then the tutor will be motivated to stay with the program. Learning should be fun, and so should teaching. If a relationship and foundation is built, then when the going gets tough, both tutor and learner will be less likely to give up.

    LG said...

    I'm not thinking about what would make me drop out of the tutoring role; now I'm focusing on the possibilities for very positive impact on the learner being able to work with him/her on a 1:1 basis. I think the relationship can fall apart for many of the same reasons for tutor and for learner: health, transportation, time constraints, or feeling that the match is not a good one between tutor and learner.

    Michael Gooch said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?
    -We both want to get more out of our lives than we are getting in the absence of the tutoring.

    Teiji Epling said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?
    Especially in the case of learners who are embarrassed or even ashamed of not being able to read, their motivation as well as mine is an intrinsic sort of motivation: I don't have to be doing this, but I want to be doing this in order to better myself and those around me. In a learning environment such as this intrinsic motivation is much more powerful than extrinsic motivation, in which you are being forced into something.

    Josh Lipovetsky said...

    My desire to tutor is pretty high, and an adult who reaches out voluntarily to receive tutoring services would be an excellent match. It would be different if the person was required to tutor, though.

    A factor that would cause me to drop out of tutoring...I don't really see any. Violence wouldn't be pleasant at all. But reading is such an amazing skill to have, and this is how I can make a big difference.

    My goal is to evaluate the learner's goals, and constantly weave my tutoring plan around those goals. Not my goals; theirs.

    Jill S said...

    I believe whether we want to admit it or not, the motivation and commitment to improving reading and writing skills by learners does impact the motivation of tutors to continue. What I have to keep in mind is if I have a learner who is just not committed to learning then I need to work hard to define why that is and try my best to address that If that doesn't work then go back to the Learner/Tutor Agreement and just admit that the partnership is not working for whatever reason and encourage the learner to seek other assistance as he/she needs and move on to another learner. The most important part for me as a tutor is not to become discouraged by this instance and let it impact my belief that what I am doing is important.

    Jill S said...

    I believe whether we want to admit it or not, the motivation and commitment to improving reading and writing skills by learners does impact the motivation of tutors to continue. What I have to keep in mind is if I have a learner who is just not committed to learning then I need to work hard to define why that is and try my best to address that If that doesn't work then go back to the Learner/Tutor Agreement and just admit that the partnership is not working for whatever reason and encourage the learner to seek other assistance as he/she needs and move on to another learner. The most important part for me as a tutor is not to become discouraged by this instance and let it impact my belief that what I am doing is important.

    Megan said...

    What factors do you think would cause you to drop out of tutoring?

    - There are a few things that could cause me to drop out of tutoring. One of them may be that the learners are not motivated or committed to learning. It could be frustrating on my end to not see results and it may motivate me to quit. (Hopefully I would not do that, but - rather - would try to find a better match for the learner and for myself.)

    Another factor would be unforeseeable changes in my life, such as family or work engagements that take up my time, or health issues.

    Tutoring is important to me, though, and my motivation levels are pretty high. I fully expect that, even with a few dings, I will continue to enjoy this adventure.

    Debbie said...

    I'm actually considering tutoring adults in ESL classes so I think I'm in the wrong place. Goodbye and good luck to everyone.

    lynette ohalleron said...

    I can't think of a reason why I would drop out of tutoring,other than an unexpected emergency. I believe I have enough support through RGI and AmeriCorps. I understand there will be some setbacks and obstacles, but I will try to prepare as best I can.I think I should prepare for the worst, but ALWAYS expect the best.

    Minette Mauldin said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?
    Answering the first question, I would say that similarly to an adult learner, I am motivated to tutor because of the opportunities for learning, professional development, making a difference in people's lives, and later employment.

    Genevieve McCall said...

    The learner's motivation and my own will be similar. We both want to see results. We both want to see the fruits of our labor. The author of the article stated that he was motivated by the accomplishments of the learners he worked with, and I imagine the learners feel the same way. The learners come into the program with a goal in mind. As a tutor, my goals will be to see the students reach their potential.

    North Hills Member said...

    If I did not feel kindness and basic respect from the staff, I might be uncomfortable and wish to quit being a tutor.

    This makes me realize how important it is for learners to feel kindness and basic respect from me, else they will be far more inclined to quit.

    E.A. Poe said...

    One of the things that can cause me drop out of tutoring is those sudden changes in life that become a priority. as would the person learning would also drop out because something that needs their attention and it wont be able to wait

    John Lynch said...

    Only health concerns or family matters, I think, would make me give up tutoring. I found my time spent tutoring in college to be very rewarding.

    Madame E said...

    I hope and imagine tutoring to be very rewarding, despite obstacles that might arise. Apart from unforeseen health problems, I do not see anything getting in the way of tutoring, perseverance is key.

    Rosa Solano said...

    A factor that would lead me to stop tutoring is finding a job that would not allow me to attend on the days I need to be there. Also, that feeling of getting nowhere with a student.

    domthom92090 said...

    The only things I can foresee hindering my choice not to be a tutor would be: 1) If the schedules of the adults I'm tutoring aren't conducive to mine due to my "at home" responsibilities and 2) If I feel my tutoring style or lack of experience is ineffective to the students. The last thing I want to do is commit to something and not be properly equipped to follow through. Which will in turn effect both the student and tutoring team.

    Dan said...

    I am motivated by impacting an individual's life, while the adult learner may be eager to learn. A lack of passion on either side may impact the relationship and lead to an end to the tutoring.

    Key said...

    I would stop tutoring if I can't find safe places to tutor.

    Key said...

    I would stop tutoring if I am not able to find a safe place to tutor.

    Vanessa Ortiz said...

    A factor that may cause someone to drop out of tutoring is a lack of respect. If a teacher mocks a students accent/ability to learn- it can then become frustrating for the student. The outcome would be for the studnet to dropout.

    Ajfae said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?

    If the adult learner is not motivated it makes for a difficult situation. If the adult learner isn't interested in learning, then I would feel less motivated to show up, but I would still want to try.

    MuddyPaws said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?
    My family came to the US when I was 12 yrs. old and I remember how difficult it was for us to learn the new language/culture. I would like to help ESOLs overcome some of the obstacles we faced.

    Dev Aaron said...

    We've both decided to learn something new that may be uncomfortable, especially at the beginning. So we are in the same boat and both feel vulnerable and uncertain.

    I would want to stop if I wasn't able to spark some excitement and motivation in the learner or if s/he was very inconsistent about coming and practicing, that is, if I felt too frustrated at our progress.

    Many factors could cause a learner to stop - boredom, life stresses, or not having a good personality match with the tutor.

    Ian Cardenas said...

    A factor that would cause me to drop out of tutoring would be if I truly felt I was doing more harm than good. Mind you, I would surely try and try again before being that extreme, but if I am just a really bad tutor, maybe its not the right area of work for me. I want these people to learn, not waste their time with someone who can't seem to teach them.

    Kathryn Poe said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?

    The more motivated the adult learner is I think the more motivated you are to tutor him/her. If one of you seems to lack a passion to be there it will probably be contagious.

    Johanna Buttler said...

    My reasons for exiting from the programme would be mainly, health issues, family commitment, lack of understanding between student and tutor and the biggest of all, lack of transport

    Tana said...

    I would think when "duty calls" would be a time for students to drop out of tutoring. Depending on children, their job, their spouse, and even their health. These are issues that could prevent a person from having the time and/or ability to attend tutoring. The same would go for the educators. As a learner, one could also become discouraged or frustrated; depending on the situation and the person, that could be grounds on giving up. That's why the tutor's job is so important to keep the students interested and confident in themselves.

    Tiffany H. said...


    What factors do you think would cause you to drop out of tutoring?

    1. Increasing demands from job and job location
    2. Increasing demands from family and school
    3. Believing that I will not make a positive difference in the student's life

    Locs of Patience said...

    I know for a fact my obligations to my children's needs would cause me to drop out of tutoring. Also extra demands at work would influence me to drop out of tutoring.

    Kim Gerlach said...

    I'm only on my 4th meeting with my student so I'm not sure yet how her feelings about it compare to mine. I'm still gaining trust and we laugh now, so I think it's something she somewhat enjoys.

    mayraeg89 said...

    The attendance of the participants does parallel with my motivations and desires to teach but only to a certain extend. There has been times when only one student shows up to class, others couldn't make it due to their jobs, and well although it changes the lesson plans that I may have worked so hard on, I get to do one on one. I think is beneficial for both the student and myself. Yes I do feel joyful and very passionate to have a group of participants learn together at the same time but having just one is great too.

    S.Hunt said...

    It's likely that I would drop out of tutoring if I had a health issue or family issues. I think these reasons are some of which cause learners not to attend sessions or drop out as well.

    Drew Beverly said...

    I would drop out of tutoring if I had health issues or if the tutor was not respecting me. I think those reasons are why adult learners do not attend or drop out of tutoring.

    Drew Beverly said...

    I would drop out of tutoring if I had health issues or if the tutor was not respecting me. I think those reasons are why adult learners do not attend or drop out of tutoring.

    Kashayla R. said...

    Some reasons that would cause a student to remain in tutoring are the student has a tutor that one can rely on, the tutor is patient and willing to do overtime for the student. Another reason is one has developed a positive attitude for literacy, and as a result, get good grades. On the contrary, a student is more likely to drop out if one feels that they can't measure up and gets poor grades.

    Steven Thibodeau said...

    It would appear that West Virginia has a lot of "literacy" challenges

    Kirsti said...

    A student would most likely quit for personal obligations (family, health issues, a new job, a move) or out of frustration if they feel they are not learning at all or quickly enough. One of the best ways I can think of to prevent both is to foster open communication to ensure sessions are at a convenient time and location as well as consist of activities the student feel's are constructive and getting them closer to achieving their goals.

    lisakay said...

    A very interesting interview. I like the ideas used for learning every day reading like product labels and menus. This tutor shows that he really wants to know and help his "learners." I think that I will be motivated as the tutor by the student's willingness to learn. I don't want to feel that I am wasting my time and I don't want my student to feel that way either. As the tutor, I think that I need to take the lead for making the tutoring sessions positive and interesting. Seeing my student progress, even if slowly if he or she is trying, will keep me coming back for more.

    Maureen Davis said...

    There are several factors that could cause a student to drop out of the program, most of which have to do with how comfortable the student feels in the learning environment. If the tutor is not amiable and does not work to make their student feel at ease, then the student may in turn not open up as much as he/she would with a tutor who he/she is able to relate to. A student may feel unsupported, unrecognized or not intelligent enough. Life tends to get in the way as well - being laid off, a family emergency, etc.

    Cambria said...

    Changes in students lives are definitely a factor. Sometimes its hard for them to stay motivated because the results take a little longer than expected, but I try my best to keep going, to inspire them and to help them the best way I can.

    Kelli Nicholson said...

    Adults drop out of the program because of life events and a belief that they will never reach their goals. If all of my students didn't want to be with me, it would make me question my desire to become an adult literacy tutor.

    Rebekka said...

    I understand that tutoring can be very challenging for both the tutor and the student. For me, probably the main factor that would cause me to drop out of tutoring would be the student's lack of commitment. I know it will probably be a struggle to attend sessions sometimes (with juggling work/family) but missing several meetings or showing a lack of interest during meetings would be very off-putting for me.

    Jennifer Smith said...

    I am committed to this process. I could see how family obligations could cause an individual to drop out of the program; however, having a supportive family could prevent such things from happening.

    Allison Black said...

    Factors that would cause you to drop out of tutoring:
    1. Lack of respect or communication
    2. Health issues
    3. Feeling inadequate

    Allison Smith said...

    Factors that would cause me to drop out of tutoring:
    1. Lack of lesson creativity on the tutor's part
    2. Work obligations
    3. More criticism than encouragement from the tutor.

    Roger Innes said...

    On point two, I think I might lose interest if I don't see progress from the student after a number of months. But I think relating to point three, the adult student might do the same and quit. So the challenge is to stay positive and keep the lessons interesting for both the student and the tutor. Both also need patience and realistic goals.

    Roger I.

    JonS said...

    Common issues would include motivation (or lack thereof) and unexpected external factors (family or work issues, etc.).

    Janet said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?
    My motivation to tutor adult learners is intrinsic and so is the adult learner’s motivation. There may be a future monetary reward for the adult learner but it’s not immediate. The adult learner must have internal motivation in order to deal with the frustration and immediate sacrifice needed to learn basic reading and writing skills.

    Stefanie Craig said...

    Some factors that might cause me to drop out of tutoring would be lack of connection with the tutor or feeling like the tutor thinks he or she is better than me. When I am working with adult learners, I think about these factors and do my best to create a solid foundation with the learner. I create a connection and good relationship and make it very clear that I have the learner's best interests at heart and I care about them and their progress.

    Lucie-Gabrielle Jolicoeur said...

    I believe the only two things that would make me quit would either be simple lack of time (probably due to a life-change like a new job, health issues, etc.) or a rebarbative student. Fortunately, I don't expect his last to be very common with adult learners since they are doing this voluntarily.

    Lori Yancey said...

    The two things that I believe would prevent me from continuing my tutorship would be failing health or a lack of success with my student.
    Lori Yancey

    Susan P. said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?
    If I see completed assignments, active participation, even leading the session, I will be greatly encouraged to give this learner everything I can to move forward and meet stated goals.

    But, if the learner seems to be just attending the session with little to no buy-in for homework or for active participation, I will try to find out what the problem is: it could be past experiences with learning, it could be lack of trust in me, it could be my attitude. Then, I will need help from the program leaders to isolate the problem(s) so we can work on those.

    Sriram Santhana krishnan said...

    How does your adult learner's motivation to attend tutoring sessions parallel your desire to tutor?
    When there is a good rapport with the student.

    What factors do you think would cause you to drop out of tutoring?
    May be when my health is failing or something to with my semester exam ;-)

    How would these factors compare to an adult student's reason for staying in a program or quitting it?
    Being too strict & not being motivating can be some factors for adult students to quit the program

    Michael O said...

    I would drop out of tutoring if I felt the tutor did not respect me, or if they viewed themselves as more intelligent than me.

    Michael O said...

    I would drop out of tutoring if I felt the tutor did not respect me, or if they viewed themselves as more intelligent than me.

    Michael O said...
    This comment has been removed by the author.
    Katie Redmiles said...

    I think time commitment would be the most likely reason I would drop out tutoring. Too much stress or other obligations life throws at us can seem overwhelming and unmanageable.

    Robert D said...

    What factors do you think would cause you to drop out of tutoring?

    I would drop out if faced with a detrimental financial hardship causing me to become homeless.

    AmeriCorpsMember13 said...

    I would drop out if I the tutor was continually negative about my efforts or progress. I might also quit if I felt my efforts were not leading to any improvement.

    Raechon C. said...

    An accident or serious illness are reasons for dropping out of tutoring.

    MaShonda Macklin said...

    I am fueled by my student's willingness to learn, so as a tutor, I expect the same to hold true. If the learner is attending sessions on a regular basis (or at least as often as they can) and they are working hard while they are there, it will make me want to work even harder to make sure that I am doing what I can to tutor them and accommodate them. This is not to say that all students will not get 100% from me. I would like for my desire to be equal to or greater than their motivation.

    Glen Lea said...

    I'm fueled by a desire to help the adult learners make progress toward their reading goals. I'm a goal-oriented person. I believe a majority of adult learners come to tutoring with a specific goal in mind. In essence, their goal is my goal. Whatever the adult learner wants to get out of tutoring is what I want to provide him or her. As long as we are making steady progress toward achieving my adult learner's goal, I will be satisfied and remain motivated.

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